Sweet Corn

Recommended Varieties: Most sweet corn varieties are acceptable for canning and freezing.
Sweet Corn - Articles

Updated: September 18, 2017

Sweet Corn

Temptation, Delectable, and Providence are good extra-sweet bicolor varieties. Silver King, Silver Princess, and Whiteout are extra-sweet white varieties.

Quantity

A bushel of ears weighs 35 pounds and yields 6 to 11 quarts of whole-kernel style or 12 to 20 pints of cream-style corn. An average of 31½ pounds (in husks) is needed for a 7-quart canner load of whole-kernel corn. An average of 20 pounds is needed for a 9-pint canner load of cream-style corn. An average of 2½ pounds makes 1 pint of frozen whole-kernel corn.

Quality

Preserve corn within 2 to 6 hours of harvest for best quality. Select ears containing kernels of ideal maturity for eating fresh. Sweeter varieties may turn brown when canned, especially if processed at 15 pounds of pressure. Can a small amount and check color and flavor before canning large amounts. White sweet corn varieties can appear a little grayish after canning and have less nutrition than yellow or bicolor varieties.

Preparation

Husk ears, remove silk, trim out insect-damaged kernels, if needed, trim off ends of ears to remove small fibrous kernels, and wash ears.

To Prepare Whole-Kernel Corn

  1. For freezing or canning, place ears in 1 gallon of boiling water and blanch for 3 minutes after the water returns to a boil.
  2. Cool ears and cut kernels from cob at about three-fourths of the depth of kernel. Do not scrape the cob.

To Prepare Cream-Style Corn

For freezing or canning:

  1. Blanch ears for 4 minutes in boiling water.
  2. Cool ears and cut kernels from cob at about one-half of their depth.
  3. Scrape the cob with a knife to remove the remainder of the kernels and combine with half-kernels.

To Prepare Corn-on-the-Cob

For freezing:

  1. Blanch small ears for 7 minutes in boiling water; blanch medium-sized ears for 9 minutes; and blanch large ears for 11 minutes.
  2. Cool in several changes of cold water and drain.
  3. If desired, cut ears into uniform 4-, 6-, or 8-inch pieces.

Freezing Procedure

Don't freeze more than 2 pounds of food per cubic foot of freezer capacity per day. To package whole-kernel or creamstyle corn:

  • Fill pint or quart plastic freezer containers, tapered freezer jars, or zip-type freezer bags. Squeeze air from plastic bags, seal, and label.

If using rigid freezer containers, allow ½ inch of headspace for whole-kernel corn and 1 inch of headspace for quarts of cream-style corn.

To package corn-on-the cob, fill into quart or half-gallon freezer bags. Squeeze out air, seal, label, and freeze.

Canning Procedure

  1. Corn must be processed in a pressure canner.
  2. Wash jars. Prepare lids according to manufacturer's instructions.
  3. Whole-kernel corn may be canned in pints or quarts. Cream-style corn must be packed in half-pint or pint jars only.
  4. If desired, add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart, ½ teaspoon per pint, or ¼ teaspoon per halfpint jar.

For raw-packed

  1. Whole-kernel-style corn, fill jars with cut product, leaving 1 inch of headspace.
  2. Add boiling water over the corn in each jar, leaving 1 inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles.
  3. Wipe sealing surface of jars with a clean, damp paper towel, add lids, tighten screw bands, and process.

For hot packs

  1. Add 1 cup of hot water for each quart of whole-kernel corn or 1 cup of hot water for each pint of cream-style corn, and heat to a boil.
  2. Fill jars with hot corn and cooking liquid, leaving 1 inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe the sealing surface of the jars with a clean, damp paper towel, add lids, tighten screw bands, and process.

To Process in a Pressure Canner

Corn must be processed in a pressure canner.

  1. Wash jars. Prepare lids according to manufacturer's instructions.
  2. Whole-kernel corn may be canned in pints or quarts. Cream-style corn must be packed in half-pint or pint jars only.
  3. If desired, add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart, ½ teaspoon per pint, or ¼ teaspoon per halfpint jar.

For raw-packed

  1. Whole-kernel-style corn, fill jars with cut product, leaving 1 inch of headspace. Add boiling water over the corn in each jar, leaving 1 inch of headspace.
  2. Remove air bubbles. Wipe sealing surface of jars with a clean, damp paper towel, add lids, tighten screw bands, and process.

For hot packs

  1. Add 1 cup of hot water for each quart of whole-kernel corn or 1 cup of hot water for each pint of cream-style corn, and heat to a boil.
  2. Fill jars with hot corn and cooking liquid, leaving 1 inch of headspace.
  3. Remove air bubbles. Wipe the sealing surface of the jars with a clean, damp paper towel, add lids, tighten screw bands, and process.

Table 1.

Recommended process times in a pressure canner at designated altitudes for whole-kernel corn. Canner gauge pressure (in pounds) at altitude of:

  • 0-8,000 ft use for dial gauge canner
  • 0-Above 1,000 ft use for weighted gauge canner
Style of packJar sizeTime (min)0-2,000 ft2,001-4,000 ft4,001-6,000 ft6,001-8,000 ft1-1,000 ftAbove 1,000 ft
Raw or hotPint55111213141015
Quart85111213
14
10
15

Table 2.

Recommended process times in a pressure canner at designated altitudes for whole-kernel corn. Canner gauge pressure (in pounds) at altitudes of:

  • 0-8,000 ft use for dial gauge canner
  • 0-Above 1,000 ft use for weighted gauge canner
Style of packJar sizeTime (min)0-2,000 ft2,001-4,000 ft4,001-6,000 ft6,001-8,000 ft0-1,000 ftAbove 1,000 ft
HotPints or half-pints85111213141015

Prepared by Luke LaBorde, associate professor of food science, Nancy Wiker, senior extension educator and Martha Zepp, extension project assistant

Instructors

Tracking Listeria monocytogenes in produce production, packing, and processing environments Food safety validation of mushroom growing, packing, and processing procedures Farm food safety, Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) training Hazards Analysis and Risk Based Preventive Controls (HACCP) training Technical assistance to home and commercial food processors Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA)

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