Stormwater Education in Mount Holly Springs, Cumberland County

Visitors to the annual festival had an opportunity to learn about how stormwater can impact their local waterways.
Stormwater Education in Mount Holly Springs, Cumberland County - News

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Mia Yencha makes it rain as part of Penn State Extension’s “Rain to Drain” activity at Mount Holly Springs’ Holly Festival Day Celebration on September 15. (Photo: Heather Couch)

Like many small towns in Pennsylvania, officials in Mount Holly Springs are becoming increasingly aware of the stormwater generated in their community. Nestled against the forested flanks of South Mountain in Cumberland County, this picturesque town is bisected east to west by Mountain Creek, a popular destination for trout fisherman seeking both stocked and native fish. Borough Council members understand how important clean water is for the town’s future.

Under the leadership of council member Katie Daniels, the Council worked with Penn State Extension to develop an interactive stormwater education booth for the 41st annual Holly Festival Day, an annual community fair which attracts scores of vendors and hundreds of visitors. The exhibit manned by Water Resources Educator, Andy Yencha, featured a stormwater quiz visitors could take to qualify for a free rain barrel drawing, a “make and take” miniature rain garden for children to build, and hands-on demonstrations of Extension’s 4-H Rain-to-Drain activity.

Council Member Daniels was thrilled with the community’s response to the event. Many residents now have a better understanding of how stormwater is generated on their property and the impacts that can occur as runoff drains into Mountain Creek.

For more information on stormwater management for communities visit Stormwater Basics on the Penn State Extension website.

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