Spotted Lanternfly: What to Look For

Spotted Lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, is a new threat to Pennsylvania and the United States, and experts are still learning how to combat it.
Spotted Lanternfly: What to Look For - Articles

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All life stages of the spotted lanternfly, from egg to adult.
Freshly laid egg masses, which are about 1” long and laid on hard surfaces, including trees, stones, patio furniture, etc. The egg masses are covered in a white putty-like substance, which age over time to look like cracked mud. Image by Erica Smyers.
Old egg masses, which have the putty or mud-like covering worn off. Here, you can see each individual seed-like egg. Image by Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
An early stage nymph (1st-3rd instars). These hatch from the eggs and are just a few centimeters in length. As they age, they grow to be ~1/4 inch long. The have black bodies and legs, and are covered in bright white spots. They are strong jumpers, and will jump when prodded or frightened. Image by Dalton Ludwick.
Several early stage nymphs feeding on a tree-of-heaven. Early instars tend to feed on the new growth of a plant, such as the stems and foliage. Image by Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
A late stage nymph (4th instars). These are the last nymph stage before becoming adults. They are ~1/2 inch long, and are bright red, covered in black stripes and white spots. They are strong jumpers, and will jump when prodded or frightened. Image by Dalton Ludwick.
A group of the late stage 4th instar nymphs, and an adult. Photo by Steve Ausmus.
The top-view of a spotted lanternfly adult. Adults are about 1” long. The females tend to be slightly larger than the males. Photo by Mike Houtz.
The side-view of a spotted lanternfly adult. Photo by Dalton Ludwick.
An adult spotted lanternfly with its wings open. While spotted lanternfly adults can fly, they often prefer to jump and glide. You will see their wings when they are flying and gliding. You may also see them when they are frightened, or when they have been poisoned with an insecticide. Photo by Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
A large group of spotted lanternfly adults, feeding at the base of a tree. Photo by Emelie Swackhamer.
The life cycle of spotted lanternfly, beginning from egg to adult. There is one generation per year in Pennsylvania. Adults die in the winter, and the eggs overwinter and hatch in the spring.