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Late season fungicides needed to protect against fruit rot in storage. Photo: K. Peter, Penn State
Apple Disease, Pre- and Post-harvest - Keep Apples Free From Fruit Rot - Articles Articles
Management considerations are discussed for mitigating pome fruit rots before and after harvesting. More
Forage Variety Trials Reports
Forage Variety Trials Reports - Articles Articles

Forage Variety Trials Reports

Marvin Hall, Ph.D.

Forage Trials Report summarizes performance data collected from ongoing forage trials at two sites in Pennsylvania. More
Determining Pasture Yield
Determining Pasture Yield - Articles Articles

Determining Pasture Yield

Marvin Hall, Ph.D.

Direct and indirect methods of determining pasture yield. More
Forage Quality in Perspective
Forage Quality in Perspective - Articles Articles

Forage Quality in Perspective

Marvin Hall, Ph.D.

Fluctuations in milk prices, feed costs, and government programs are forcing dairy farmers to become more efficient with their farm operation. More
Where to Send Samples for Analysis
Where to Send Samples for Analysis - Articles Articles
Once you have gone to the effort of correctly collecting a sample, how can you be sure that the results you receive from the testing laboratory are accurate? More
Why Test Forage Quality?
Why Test Forage Quality? - Articles Articles

Why Test Forage Quality?

Marvin Hall, Ph.D.

Greater net profit is the bottom line for why livestock producers need to know the quality of the forages they are feeding! More
A declining tree with bark removed from graft union to show necrosis. Note numerous rootstock suckers. (Photo: K. Peter)
Apple Disease - Rapid Apple Decline (RAD) or Sudden Apple Decline (SAD)? - Articles Articles
There is a mystery surrounding rapid apple decline/sudden apple decline of young, dwarf apple trees. More
Plum Pox Virus
Plum Pox Virus - Articles Articles

Plum Pox Virus

Kari A. Peter, Ph.D.

Plum pox virus (PPV), or Sharka, is a viral disease that infects not only plum but other economically important Prunus species. More
Young galls are light in color and with age become dark and hard, ½ inch to 3 or 4 inches in diameter. Photo by B. Butler.
Tree Fruit Disease - Crown Gall - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Disease - Crown Gall

Kari A. Peter, Ph.D.

Crown gall is caused by a bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and affects apples, pears, quince, peaches, nectarines, apricots, plums, and cherries. More
Source: K. Yoder.
Apple Disease - Brooks Fruit Spot - Articles Articles

Apple Disease - Brooks Fruit Spot

Kari A. Peter, Ph.D.

Caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella pomi, Brooks fruit spot is also known as Phoma fruit spot. The disease attacks apple and crabapple trees and is rarely found in well-sprayed orchards. More
Pear Disease - Stony Pit
Pear Disease - Stony Pit - Articles Articles

Pear Disease - Stony Pit

Kari A. Peter, Ph.D.

Stony pit of pear is presumed to be caused by a destructive virus, but the virus has not been isolated. Affected fruit are unsightly and unmarketable. More
Photo by K. Peter.
Pear Disease - Sooty Mold - Articles Articles

Pear Disease - Sooty Mold

Kari A. Peter, Ph.D.

Sooty mold fungi of the genus Capnodium cause an unsightly blackening over the surface of fruit and leaves. More
A characteristic symptom of shoot blight is the bending of terminal growth into the shape of a shepherd’s crook. Photo by K. Peter.
Apple Disease - Fire Blight - Articles Articles

Apple Disease - Fire Blight

Kari A. Peter, Ph.D.

Fire blight, Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease that can attack some 75 species of plants of the rose family. More
Source: Joseph OBrien, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Plum Disease - Plum Leaf Spot - Articles Articles

Plum Disease - Plum Leaf Spot

Kari A. Peter, Ph.D.

Leaf spot of plums and prune-type plums is caused by the fungus Coccomyces prunophorae. More
Source: William M. Brown Jr., Bugwood.org
Peach Disease - Powdery Mildew of Peach, Nectarine, and Apricot - Articles Articles
Powdery mildew, Sphaerotheca pannosa, sometimes called rose mildew (it affects some woody ornamentals), is not often serious. More
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