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Most adults emerge and lay up to 500 eggs during July and August on tree trunks, in cracks or under bark scales, and in soil near the tree trunk. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Peachtree Borer - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Peachtree Borer

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa, is primarily a pest of peach and nectarine trees, but it also attacks apricot, cherry, and plum. More
Source: Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org
Tree Fruit Mite Pest - Twospotted Spider Mite - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Mite Pest - Twospotted Spider Mite

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, while a pest of apple, peach, and other fruit trees, also feeds on a wide range of both wild and cultivated plants. More
Orchards may be invaded by young larvae ballooning long distances on silk threads. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Gypsy Moth - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Gypsy Moth

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, may attack fruit trees, especially apple, causing defoliation that can stunt or kill young trees. More
Adult beetles are ¼ inch long, dark brown with whitish patches, with four humps on their wing covers, and a protruding snout one-third its body length. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Plum Curculio - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Plum Curculio

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, is an injurious pest of apples, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums throughout the state. More
Oriental fruit moth are gray, with a wing spread of ¼ inch; the wings are gray with dark markings. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Oriental Fruit Moth - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Oriental Fruit Moth

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta, is a pest of most stone and pome fruits. In pome fruits, its appearance and injury is similar to that of the codling moth and lesser appleworm. More
Adults feed on leaves and fruit. They chew leaf tissue between veins and leave a lacelike skeleton. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Japanese Beetle - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Japanese Beetle

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica, is one of the best-known pests to be encountered by Pennsylvania fruit growers, nursery operators, and gardeners. More
The aphids’ bodies are nearly covered by a woolly mass of long waxy fibers that gives them a whitish, mealy appearance and that are much shorter on the root-inhabiting aphids. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Woolly Apple Aphid - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Woolly Apple Aphid

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The woolly apple aphid, Eriosoma lanigerum, is a widely distributed pest of apple trees, especially where its parasites have been killed by insecticides. More
Upon hatching, crawlers immediately move to new sites. Female crawlers are generally more active and disperse throughout the tree. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - White Peach Scale - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - White Peach Scale

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

White peach scale, Pseudalacaspis pentagona, is considered an economic pest of peach and woody ornamentals in southeastern United States. More
Source: Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Western Flower Thrips - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Western Flower Thrips

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Widespread fruit loss from western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, was first observed in early 1990. More
Source: Todd M. Gilligan and Marc E. Epstein, CSU, Bugwood.org
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Variegated Leafroller - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Variegated Leafroller

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Although variegated leafroller, Platynota flavedana, is an important pest of apple in Virginia and West Virginia, it only occasionally causes damage in southern Pennsylvania. More
The tufted apple bud moth is named for the tufted scales that can be seen as two or three groups on the tops of the wings. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest -Tufted Apple Bud Moth - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest -Tufted Apple Bud Moth

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The tufted apple bud moth, Platynota idaeusalis, is a serious direct pest of apples in the five-state Cumberland-Shenandoah region of the eastern United States. More
Source: Eric R. Day, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Spotted Wing Drosophila - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Spotted Wing Drosophila

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is an invasive species originally from Asia. More
Source: Ben Sale, available under creative commons license 2.0 creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Spotted Tentiform Leafminer - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Spotted Tentiform Leafminer

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The spotted tentiform leafminer, Phyllonorycter blancardella, affects the leaves of apple trees throughout the growing season. More
Source: Natasha Wright, Cook's Pest Control, Bugwood.org
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Shothole Borer - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - Shothole Borer

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The shothole borer, Scolytus rugulosus, sometimes called the fruit tree bark beetle, is a native of Europe but now occurs throughout the United States. More
Scales on new growth and fruit produce deep purplish-red coloration in the tissue. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Tree Fruit Insect Pest - San Jose Scale - Articles Articles

Tree Fruit Insect Pest - San Jose Scale

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The San Jose scale, Quadraspidiotus perniciosus, is a pest of fruit trees, but it attacks many other trees as well as shrubs. More
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