See All Pest, Disease and Weed Identification

64 Results

List Grid

Russ Ottens, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Home Orchards, Table 2.1. Important Insects and Mites - Articles Articles
Informational table showing direct and indirect fruit pests. More
Young galls are light in color and with age become dark and hard, ½ inch to 3 or 4 inches in diameter. Photo by B. Butler.
Crown Gall - Articles Articles

Crown Gall

Kari A. Peter, Ph.D.

Crown gall is caused by a bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and affects apples, pears, quince, peaches, nectarines, apricots, plums, and cherries. More
Source: A Jones.
Pear Leaf Spot - Articles Articles
The pear leaf spot fungus, Mycosphaerella pyri, infects the leaves of pear, quince, and occasionally apple trees. Numerous leaf spots can produce defoliation. More
Types of Weeds
Types of Weeds - Articles Articles
To adequately control weeds in the small-scale orchard, you should learn proper weed identification. More
M.G. Klein, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Home Orchards: Table 4.4. Disease, Insect, and Mites on Apples and Pears - Articles Articles
Occurrence of diseases, insects, and mites on apples and pears during the growing season. More
Gerald Holmes, California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo, Bugwood.org
Home Orchards: Table 2.4. Plant Protection Materials - Articles Articles
Informational table showing pesticides available for home garden use on various fruit crops. More
Home Gardening: Stony Pit
Home Gardening: Stony Pit - Articles Articles
Stony pit of pear is presumed to be caused by a destructive virus, but the virus has not been isolated. More
Home Orchard: Table 2.3. Pesticide Application Amounts Home Orchard: Table 2.3. Pesticide Application Amounts - Articles
Informational table showing pesticide application amounts on fruit. More
Large Plastic Delta trap with sticky liner baited with Oriental fruit moth sex pheromone lure
Monitoring Insects in Commercial Fruit Orchards - Articles Articles

Monitoring Insects in Commercial Fruit Orchards

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Monitoring insect pests continues to be one of the pillars of integrated pest management in Pennsylvania orchards. More
Yellow Jackets and Hornets in Pennsylvania Tree Fruit Orchards
Yellow Jackets and Hornets in Pennsylvania Tree Fruit Orchards - Articles Articles
While greater opportunities for biological control of some apple pests exist in today's orchards, we are seeing a greater diversity of generalist predators. More
Toxicity of Orchard Pesticides to Mite and Aphid Predators
Toxicity of Orchard Pesticides to Mite and Aphid Predators - Articles Articles
The biological control potential of the vast majority of beneficial arthropods is not realized unless only pesticides that are selective and nontoxic to these arthropods are used. More
Under normal conditions, overwintering adults emerge from their winter hideouts in early spring to mid-June and immediately move to feed on available hosts. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Orchards - Articles Articles

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Orchards

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys, is an exotic insect species naturally occurring in Japan, southern China, and Korea. More
Source: Bugwood.org
Phytophthora Collar, Crown and Root Rots - Articles Articles
Phytophthora collar, crown, and root rots continue to be a major cause of tree death in Pennsylvania orchards. These rots can affect both pome and stone fruit. More
Blister mites become active at bud break, migrate to the tender, new leaves, and burrow beneath the epidermis of the undersides of leaves to feed. This results in a gall, or blister, in which the eggs are laid. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Pear Blister Mite and Pear Rust Mite - Articles Articles

Pear Blister Mite and Pear Rust Mite

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Pearleaf blister mite, Phytoptus pyri, and pear rust mite, Epitrimerus pyri, are similar species, virtually invisible to the naked eye, that often are common on unsprayed trees. More
The codling moth wing is generally a darker shade of gray near the base, with a dark patch containing coppery scales near the inside wing tip. Photo by G. Krawczyk.
Codling Moth - Articles Articles

Codling Moth

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk, Ph.D.

Codling moth, Cydia pomonella, was introduced from Europe in colonial times and now occurs throughout North America as well as most of the world, wherever apples are grown. More
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5