Kindergarten Readiness: Learning Skills

Learn ways to support curiosity and help children explore the world around them.
Kindergarten Readiness: Learning Skills - Videos

Description

When children are ready and eager to learn, they are open to absorbing, questioning and processing all the information that is around them. Learning skills include: being attentive, listening in a group, following simple directions, asking questions, staying with a task, and exploring.

Instructors

Family Strengths Parenting Skill Development Drug and Alcohol Prevention

More by Denise Continenza 

View Transcript

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- [Narrator] Children's interests in the world around them, what it is, and how it works, is referred to as learning skills.

Learning skills are similar to social and emotional development.

They are skills that many kindergarten teachers say are equally important for school success.

When children are ready and eager to learn, they are open to absorbing, questioning, and processing all the information that is around them.

Learning skills include being attentive, listening in a group, following simple directions, asking questions, staying with a task, and exploring.

Children who are eager to learn are curious and want to know more.

They ask, why and how a lot.

They want to explore by touching things and figuring out how they work.

Curious children are learning children.

Children who learn to appreciate books early are set on a path for life...

Children who learn to appreciate books early are set on a path for lifetime learning.

Much research supports the connection between reading and academic success.

Studies have also repeatedly demonstrate that children who are read to and have access to books are more likely to stay in school and stay out of trouble later in life.

Since there is so much to be gained by children with good learning skills, you may wonder how you as a parent can help your child become an active learner.

Parents can foster learning skills by asking open-ended questions, things that require more than a yes or no answer.

For example, what should we do next?

You can encourage thinking by asking your child questions like, I wonder what would happen if.

Pique your child's curiosity by showing your own enthusiasm about a topic.

For example, you might say, I can't wait to see the new tiger exhibit at the zoo.

Help them stay on task by giving them small chores and encouraging them to stick with it.

Give simple, one-step directions.

Your garden or backyard is a great place for children to develop these learning skills.

Nature provides a ready-made curriculum for every child.

Now you try.

How can you use your garden or backyard to help your child develop skills that will help him or her to be a ready learner?

If you saw bugs or flowers, you might ask your child questions about them, or perhaps talk about what the bugs are doing or how flowers grow.

Your child can help you water the garden and you can give simple directions.

You could also provide your child with encouragement for a job well done.

A day in the garden might be followed with a trip to the library to find books about certain kinds of bugs or flowers.

To expand learning, you might collect things like leaves or pine cones.

Learning skills can be taught every day, anytime you have an opportunity to explore with your child.

Watching a child's life....

Learning skills can be taught every day, anytime you have an opportunity to explore with your child.

Watching a child's eyes light up is refreshing.

Seeing the world through a child's eyes is priceless.

You are instrumental in helping your child become an enthusiastic and eager student.

Remember, you are your child's first and most important teacher.

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