Home Orchards: Table 4.2. Non-Scab Resistant Apple Varieties

Informational table showing apple varieties that are non-resistant to apple scab but recommended for home planting in Pennsylvania.
Home Orchards: Table 4.2. Non-Scab Resistant Apple Varieties - Articles

Updated: October 12, 2017

Home Orchards: Table 4.2. Non-Scab Resistant Apple Varieties

(Listed in order of ripening).

VarietyCharacteristicsRipening Period
Zestar!Medium to large, red-over-yellow fruit. Flavor is well balanced. Slightly sweeter than tart. Flesh is crisp and medium to coarse. Good for fresh eating and sauce.Early to mid-August
Ginger GoldGolden-type apple ripening in mid- to late August. High-quality, russet free fruit. Good for eating fresh and pies.Mid-August
GalaOrange-red fruit, sweet and hard with high quality. Developed in New Zealand. Good for eating fresh and sauce.Late August to September
BlondeeWhole tree mutation of Gala found in Portsmouth, OH. Fruit have a smooth yellow skin and tastes like Gala. Use as you would Gala for fresh eating.Late August to September
McIntoshOld-time favorite. Purchase new high-coloring strains. Available as a spur type. Good for fresh eating, pies, and sauce.Early September
HoneycrispLarge, explosively crisp, and juicy fruit. Fruit color is red-over-green ground color. Weak-growing tree. Fruit may show bitter pit when the trees are young.Mid-September
EmpireDark-red apple of excellent dessert quality. An all-purpose apple that keeps well. Good for fresh eating, pies, and sauce.Mid- to late September
AmbrosiaA chance seedling found in British Columbia. Likely a cross of Golden Delicious and Delicious. Medium size conical fruit have a sweet flavor with low acidity. The juicy fruit are very aromatic.Late September to early October
Golden DeliciousExcellent all-purpose apple. Heavy producer. Avoid spur strains because they tend to russet more than nonspur strains.Late September to early October
IdaredPopular older variety. Produces large, mildly tart, red fruit that keeps well. Good for all uses.Early to mid-October
JonagoldDeveloped in New York as a cross between Jonathan and Golden Delicious. High-quality fruit. Develops a red blush over yellow skin. It is a triploid and produces sterile pollen (see section on pollination). Good for fresh eating, sauce, and baking.Early to mid-October
CameoChance seedling from Washington. Late blooming. Fruit has red stripes over a cream colored background. Flavor is sweet/tart and flesh is non-browning.Early to mid-October
ShizukaCross between Golden Delicious and Indo. Very large, light-green to yellow fruit. It is a triploid and produces sterile pollen. Good for fresh eating, pies, sauce.Mid-October
SunCrispGolden-type apple that can develop a red or orange cheek in cooler years. Unusual cinnamon spice-flavored fruit. Tastes better after a period of storage. Good for fresh eating, sauce, and pies.Mid- to late October
FujiDeveloped in Japan. Late-ripening apple. People located above Interstate 80 might have difficulty in maturing the fruit each year. There are, however some early maturing strains available, such as Daybreak and September Wonder. Very firm, red-over-green fruit that is sweet. Stores extremely well in regular refrigeration. Good for fresh eating and pies.Late October