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Figure 1. Cool-season perennials are the mainstay of pastured dairies in the Northeast. Credit: Sjoerd Duiker
No-Till Annuals to Beat the Summer Slump on a Dairy Farm - Articles Articles

No-Till Annuals to Beat the Summer Slump on a Dairy Farm

Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA, Dave Wilson, Jessica A. Williamson, Ph.D.

This case study demonstrates how a grazing dairy farmer in southeastern Pennsylvania beats the summer slump with cool- and warm-season annuals established with no-till practices. More
Posts between the oat and annual strip create a fence between strips that are grazed and strips with grain crops. Photo by Sjoerd Duiker
Integrating Grazing in No-Till Systems on a Grain Farm - Articles Articles

Integrating Grazing in No-Till Systems on a Grain Farm

Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA, Jessica A. Williamson, Ph.D.

The adoption of no-tillage systems in Pennsylvania creates opportunities to graze after harvest. This case study examines the integration of grazing and no-tillage on a grain farm. More
Figure 1: Well-managed perennial pasture can be a highly sustainable form of land use. Photo by Sjoerd Duiker
Plant Diversity to Extend the Grazing Season - Articles Articles

Plant Diversity to Extend the Grazing Season

Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA

This case study shows how a farmer in northwestern Pennsylvania is using annuals and perennials to expand his grazing season while managing for reduced inputs and improved soil health through integration of grazing and no-tillage. More
Cover crops of rye or wheat established after corn or soybean grain harvest can still provide excellent soil protection in spring, recycle nutrients, and improve soil
There is Still Time to Plant Cover Crops - Articles Articles

There is Still Time to Plant Cover Crops

Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA

Getting cover crops established after corn or soybeans can be especially challenging due to delayed harvests. Nonetheless, farmers should still plant cover crops for many reasons. More
No-till wheat in corn residue
Small Grain Planting Considerations - Articles Articles

Small Grain Planting Considerations

Delbert G. Voight, Jr

Did wet weather delay your wheat planting? Here are some tips that might assist you with your planting decisions. More
Mary Burrows, Montana State University, Bugwood.org
Fall Weed Control in Wheat and Barley - Articles Articles

Fall Weed Control in Wheat and Barley

Dwight Lingenfelter, William S. Curran, Ph.D.

As fall weeds compete with wheat and barley establishment, below are some herbicide options to consider. More
A promising stand of alfalfa in bloom. Image Credit: Jessica Williamson
Fall Forage Establishment - Articles Articles

Fall Forage Establishment

Jessica A. Williamson, Ph.D., Marvin Hall, Ph.D.

Pasture managers and hay producers have a window of opportunity in the late summer and early fall to improve existing or establish new stands through seeding. More
Weeds growing in small grain stubble during late summer (PSU Weed Science, D. Lingenfelter)
Late Weed Control and Burndown Considerations Before Planting Fall Crops - Articles Articles
Suggestions are provided to prevent weed seed production at this time of year to reduce the weed seedbank for next season. More
Corn bound for silage harvest at silking stage (C. Guindon)
How Do I Know When it’s Time to Harvest my Corn for Silage? - Articles Articles
Timing is key when harvesting quality corn silage. Here’s how to make sure you’re hitting that window of opportunity. More
A soybean plant with Sudden Death Syndrome
Soybean Sudden Death and Brown Stem Rot: How to Tell the Difference - Articles Articles

Soybean Sudden Death and Brown Stem Rot: How to Tell the Difference

Alyssa Collins, Ph.D., Adriana Murillo-Williams

These two nasty soybean diseases can be hard to tell apart. Learn what to look for so you can know your enemy. More
Figure 1. Wax moth larvae killed by Metarhizium infection. Metarhizium spores contact, germinate, infect, and ultimately kill insect pests. Photo credit: Nick Sloff, Penn State Department of Entomology
Managing a Beneficial Soil Fungus for Insect Control - Articles Articles

Managing a Beneficial Soil Fungus for Insect Control

Mary Barbercheck, Ph.D., Imtiaz Ahmad, Christina Voortman

Pest suppression is an important function of healthy soil. The effects of cover crops and soil characteristics on a beneficial fungus are being examined. More
Oats. Photo: E. Swackhamer
Cover Crop Considerations after Small Grain Harvest - Articles Articles

Cover Crop Considerations after Small Grain Harvest

Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA

Planting a soil building cover crop after small grain harvest has many benefits, but needs to be tailored to your farm’s needs. More
Overgrazing pastures compromises pasture production and exposes the soil to erosion
Avoid Overgrazing Your Pastures - Articles Articles

Avoid Overgrazing Your Pastures

Justin Brackenrich, Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA

The summer is upon us and cool season grasses are slowing down their growth. This is the time to pay attention so you don’t overgraze those pastures. More
Soil erosion is still taking its toll in Pennsylvania but can be addressed by using proper management
Eliminating Soil Erosion - Articles Articles

Eliminating Soil Erosion

Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA

Soil erosion is still our number one sustainability issue. With the excessive rainfall we’ve had many fields are showing the scars of rills and gullies. And yet … We have the tools – so let’s put them to work. More
Scabby Heads. Image Credit: Alyssa Collins, Penn State
What to do if You Have Scab? - Articles Articles

What to do if You Have Scab?

Alyssa Collins, Ph.D., Paul D. Esker

Here’s what to consider when your small grains have been hit hard by a Fusarium head scab epidemic More
Timing corn planting with black cutworm instar development is important for preventing damage to young corn seedlings. Photo credit: Roger Schmidt, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Bugwood.org.
Black Cutworm Management in Organic Field Corn - Articles Articles
Ecological pest management and cultural strategies are the best method for protecting crops against black cutworm damage on organic farms. More
Frequent heavy rains delay planting. Photo credit: Andrew Frankenfield
Crop Insurance: Prevented Planting Details - Articles Articles
More widespread heavy rain has delayed the already delayed corn and soybean planting. Farmers are now considering their options if they still have corn and soybeans to plant. More
Hairy vetch, rye, annual ryegrass, and clover cover crop being grazed. Photo Credit: Sjoerd Duiker, Penn State University
Grazing Crop Residues and Cover Crops - Articles Articles

Grazing Crop Residues and Cover Crops

Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA

Grazing has been largely excluded from our croplands but is receiving new interest as an additional profit center for farmers as well as a way to improve soil. More
Black cutworm. John Capinera, University of Florida, Bugwood.org
Black Cutworm Moths and Slugs are Becoming Active - Articles Articles
Small numbers of black cutworm moths are arriving in Pennsylvania, while slugs are hatching from their eggs. Watch wet fields for slug damage as crops emerge. More
Photo Credit: Zachary Larson, Penn State Extension
Planting Green Impacts on Corn Emergence - Articles Articles
Corn planted into standing un-rolled cover may show reduced yields due to lower populations and greater plant height variability. More
Photo Credit: Sjoerd Duiker, Penn State Extension.
Repairing Erosion Damage and Protecting Your Fields - Articles Articles

Repairing Erosion Damage and Protecting Your Fields

Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Ph.D., CCA

Reports have come in about concentrated flow leading to rills and gully formation over the winter. How can you repair that and avoid it from happening again? More
Photo Credit: Sjoerd Duiker, Penn State Extension.
Threat of ‘Incidental Transfer’ of Manure to Streams - Articles Articles
With soil profiles being fully recharged with water and future runoff, creates the threat of ‘incidental transfer’ of nutrients and dissolved organic carbon from surface applied manure to streams and sinkholes. More
A field must have greater than 25% crop residue cover or a cover crop to be eligible for winter manure spreading, along with other restrictions. Photo credit: Charlie White
The Do’s and Don’ts of Winter Manure Spreading - Articles Articles
If winter manure spreading is absolutely unavoidable, follow these requirements to do it legally. More
Manure Fertilizer, Photo Credit: Nicole Santangelo, PSU
Is Your Farm Ready for Inspection? - Articles Articles
By the end of 2018, 1 in 5 Pennsylvania farms within the Chesapeake Bay watershed will have been visited by the Chesapeake Bay Agricultural Inspections Program. More
Can I Apply Potash in Winter?
Can I Apply Potash in Winter? - Articles Articles

Can I Apply Potash in Winter?

Charles White, Nicole Santangelo

Ensuring properly timed potassium applications where they are needed when conditions permit. More
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