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A list of all of the Activities resource pages, also listed by topic.

As young children explore paint by putting it all over their hands, or create collages with torn paper, it's noticeable how involved they get in their activities. Children delight in exploring and creating with art materials. These art experiences help children develop many life skills.

A child's journey to building strong language and literacy skills starts in infancy and continues through the early childhood years and beyond. Caregivers are essential partners for children on the path to language and emergent literacy development. The journey begins when caregivers respond to, talk with and read with infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Caregivers continue the journey by building on each child's experiences and skill base to encourage continued learning.

Young children's brains are constantly working to take in and process information. Caring adults who encourage and provide opportunities for children to problem solve, form friendships and succeed at learning tasks play a central role in building brain power in children!

Have you thought about culture lately, including your own? Working with children and families from diverse backgrounds other than the early childhood professional’s own requires continual self-reflection and learning. Children and families in early childhood education (ECE) programs are substantially diverse—whether the differences are cultural, linguistic, ability, family structure, race, religion, or socio-economic. An awareness of CLAD—cultural, linguistic, and ability diversity—is fundamental to working with children and families.

Families with busy schedules can struggle for time to put a home-cooked meal on the table, much less find time to include young children in cooking activities. What was once considered a life skill is becoming, for some, a dying art as convenience and processed foods become the norm. Yet, children can learn much more than healthy food choices through early experiences with cooking and there are benefits for families as well.

Halloween, Diwali, Muharram, Thanksgiving, Kwanzaa, Chanukah, Yule, Christmas. Do you celebrate holidays in the child care where you work? What do holiday celebrations look like in your child care?

Inclusion is a part of all aspects of education and society and yet many feel unaware and unprepared. Start the inclusion conversation. Explore the meaning and key components of inclusion and inclusion best practices.

A Kid's Guide to Being Responsible. Includes: know the rules, handling emergencies, get it together, keeping it together and parent pages.

Can one-year-olds truly be creative? If we step away from artistic expressions of creativity for a moment and just think about the essence of creativity, the answer is a loud “Yes!”

During the preschool years, young children blossom in their ability to experiment with new ideas, including new ways of creating with art materials.

The ages of three and four are busy times for language and literacy learning, including developing the ability to comprehend and tell narratives, becoming much more skilled at conversation, and beginning to understand the mechanics of written language.

When you think about art with two-year-olds, think about how to create meaningful art experiences that fit well in the busy world of twos.

Even the youngest children in military families experience the stressfulness of major changes such as the absence of a deployed parent or a move to a new duty station.

What comes to mind when you think of school readiness?

A snow day is a great time to get outside and explore nature. Nancy Rosenow encourages early childhood educators to help children see the wonders of the natural world. (Exchange 2011) When it’s snowing, help children wonder about snow!

A snow day is a great time to get outside and explore nature. Nancy Rosenow encourages early childhood educators to help children see the wonders of the natural world. (Exchange 2011) When it’s snowing, help children wonder about snow!

In today's news, people toss around acronyms like STEM and STEAM. What is the latest trend in these integrated curriculum movements? What should teachers of young children be thinking about as they plan their fall lessons and experiences?