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Young children's brains are constantly working to take in and process information. Caring adults who encourage and provide opportunities for children to problem solve, form friendships and succeed at learning tasks play a central role in building brain power in children!

This tip sheet provides a brief overview of what to expect from children as they grow and learn. Home-based providers may use this information to anticipate behaviors, plan activities, and set up a home to provide a safe and nurturing environment for the children. (download the pdf below)

An experienced adult who works effectively with a group of school-age children and youth can be inspiring. The adult seems to have control of the group, while also encouraging and engaging the youth. This is not as easy as it may look. An educational background in teaching or child development is a big help, and experience enhances the adult’s confidence. What about the adult without this type of background? How can adults coming from different backgrounds prepare themselves to interact positively with children and youth in out-of-school settings?

A series of developmental charts with cognitive, social and emotional, and physical milestones

Think of a time when you've felt angry or frustrated. What skills did you use to manage your emotions? You may have taken a deep breath to calm down, or counted to five before you responded to someone, or maybe you talked about what the problem was and how you were feeling. Using these kinds of strategies helps to manage emotions and supports healthy social and emotional development.

Inclusion is a part of all aspects of education and society and yet many feel unaware and unprepared. Start the inclusion conversation. Explore the meaning and key components of inclusion and inclusion best practices.

As children develop social and emotional awareness and skills, they are able to more effectively build and navigate relationships, identify feelings, and learn to calm down and problem-solve.

Can one-year-olds truly be creative? If we step away from artistic expressions of creativity for a moment and just think about the essence of creativity, the answer is a loud “Yes!”

During the preschool years, young children blossom in their ability to experiment with new ideas, including new ways of creating with art materials.

The ages of three and four are busy times for language and literacy learning, including developing the ability to comprehend and tell narratives, becoming much more skilled at conversation, and beginning to understand the mechanics of written language.

When you think about art with two-year-olds, think about how to create meaningful art experiences that fit well in the busy world of twos.

Even the youngest children in military families experience the stressfulness of major changes such as the absence of a deployed parent or a move to a new duty station.

What comes to mind when you think of school readiness?

As children develop social and emotional awareness and skills, they are able to more effectively build and navigate relationships, identify feelings, and learn to calm down and problem-solve. Check out our new Social Emotional Resource Summary that includes BKC modules, research to practice tip pages, and vodcasts.

The brains of newborn babies are wired to hear all of the sounds of all languages in the world.

One of the most important ways that child care professionals can support children is to understand what kinds of circumstances are most stressful for them - the vulnerability points.

A solid understanding of milestones and developmental pathways across each domain of children’s development can benefit child care providers in several ways.