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Weekly Insect Bytes for August 15, 2014

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Posted: August 15, 2014

Some of the commonly used developmental models seem to be overestimating the pace of development for codling moth and Oriental fruit moth populations in some orchards. Please use on-site monitoring as the main indicator in deciding if and when a pesticide application is necessary. All stages of brown marmorated stink bug are being observed in and outside of orchards with some locations already reporting injured fruit.
Fruit injured by brown marmorated stink bug. Photo by G. Krawczyk.

Fruit injured by brown marmorated stink bug. Photo by G. Krawczyk.

The insect pest control updates presented below are for South-central Pennsylvania based on observations in Adams County. To view the insect hatch and trapping data for all major insect pests, please visit the Penn State Fruit Research and Extension Center (FREC) website.

Current Pest Status

Second Generations of CM, TABM and OBLR and Third Generation of OFM Continuing Flights in Pome Fruit Orchards

The second generations of codling moth (CM), tufted apple bud moth (TABM) and obliquebanded leafroller (OBLR) and the third generation Oriental fruit moth (OFM) are continuing their flights in most Pennsylvania pome fruit orchards. Only site specific monitoring of each individual pest will provide accurate information if and for how long control treatments are necessary. As during the last few years, some of the commonly used developmental models seem to be overestimating the pace of development for CM and OFM populations in some orchards. Therefore, such models are not very reliable indicators of the actual pest situation. Please use on-site monitoring as the main indicator in deciding if and when the pesticide application is necessary. Applications of Altacor® (5d PHI on pome and 10d PHI on stone fruit), Belt® (14d PHI on pome, 7d PHI on stone fruit), Delegate® (7d PHI on pome fruit, 7d PHI on plums, 1d PHI on peach and nectarines), Tourismo® (14d PHI on pome and stone fruit) Voliam Flexi® (35d PHI on pome and 14d PHI on stone fruit) or Voliam Xpress® (21d PHI on pome and 14d PHI on stone fruit) should provide excellent control of CM, OFM, TABM and OBLR larvae. Codling moth granulosis virus (Cyd-X®, or Cyd-X HP) provides good control only of CM neonate larvae. Both Voliam products will also provide some control/suppression of brown marmorated stink bug.

All Stages of BMSB Present in and Outside Orchards

All stages of brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) are being observed in and outside of orchards with some locations already reporting BMSB injured fruit. The list of effective insecticide options is limited and includes products with only a few distinctive modes of action:  pyrethroids (IRAC Group 3A): Bifenture (14d PHI) and Brigade (14d PHI) (only WSB formulation, Danitol (14d PHI on pome, 3d PHI on stone fruit), and Warrior (21d PHI on pome, 14d PHI on stone fruit); neonicotinoids (IRAC Group 4A): Actara (35d PHI on pome, 14d PHI on stone fruit)), Assail (7d PHI), Scorpion and Venon (3d PHI); one carbamate product (IRAC Group 1A), Lannate (14d PHI on apple, 4d PHI on peach), and some products including combinations of two different insecticide chemistries such as in Endigo (35d PHI on pome and 14d PHI on stone fruit)  or Leverage (7d PHI). While trying to limit the impact of BMSB on fruit, please remember also about seasonal limits for the number of insecticide applications per season.

Commercially available BMSB traps baited with BMSB lures are very effective in detecting and capturing all mobile stages of BMSB present in orchards. For the best results BMSB traps should be placed in the orchard rows bordering possible sources of migrating stink bugs such as woods, soybeans or corn. As effective as the traps are in detecting migrating BMSB, they will not provide control of the bugs and should be treated only as an “early detection system.”  Commercial BMSB lures and traps are available from Ag-Bio Inc. (Phone: 877-268-2020) and Sterling International, Inc. (Phone: 509-343-3625).

WAA Control where Needed

If wooly apple aphids (WAA) are observed in the orchard, application(s) of Movento or Diazinon should provide effective control of this pest. Movento is translaminar within plants and provides good systemic activity against live WAA but for the maximum efficacy of this product, an addition of surfactant is required.

Maintaining Spray Coverage

As the season progresses and the trees become bigger, often the volume of used water per acre should be adjusted (increased). Even the most efficacious pest management products will not work if the spray coverage is not sufficient.



Contact Information

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk
  • Extension Tree Fruit Entomologist
Email:
Phone: 717-677-6116