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Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Leafroller, Oriental Fruit Moth and Pear Psylla Activity in Orchards

Posted: August 3, 2011

The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) adults and all instar nymphs are present and actively feeding in both stone and pome fruit orchards and in surrounding vegetation. The codling moth (CM) second generation flight also is underway across Pennsylvania orchards. By the end of the first week of August it will again be time to start controlling the second generations of tufted apple bud moth and obliquebanded leafroller. Although the numbers of Oriental fruit moth (OFM) observed in pheromone traps located at the Penn State Fruit Research and Extension Center continue to remain at a very low levels, from about this time of the season we should start to observe continuous flight. The pear psylla (PP) adults, eggs and nymphs are continuously present in many pear orchards, and growers should continue to apply appropriate control measures.

The insect pest control updates presented below are for the south-central part of Pennsylvania based on observations in Adams County, Pennsylvania

Current pest status

  • The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) adults and all instar nymphs are present and actively feeding in both stone and pome fruit orchards and in surrounding vegetation. New, summer generation BMSB adults started depositing new egg masses. A commercial scale light trap deployed in a corn field located in northern Maryland collected more than 5,000 adult BMSBs during a single night collection. Although the visual monitoring still remains the best BMSB monitoring technique, the currently available traps and lures utilizing another stink bug (Plautia stali) aggregation pheromone are capturing many BMSB nymphs and some low numbers of adults. The movement of summer adults from outside hosts into orchards (or other crops) and associated deposition of new eggs slowly is becoming the most important source of new BMSB infestation in orchards. While the nymphal feeding can be reduced by effective and well-timed insecticide treatments, the feeding by continuously wandering BMSB adults is very difficult to control. The choice of insecticides directed against other pests should control the portion of BMSB population present in orchards. With at least 2 more months of the current growing season to go (depending on cultivar), it is extremely important that growers plan ahead with the choice of products utilized against BMSB, and preserve the most effective options, with the shortest PHI, for applications when the pressure from this pest will increase, especially in the later part of the season. The most current update on BMSB management suggestions is accessible as a part of the latest issue of the Penn State Fruit Times Newsletter.
  • The codling moth (CM) second generation flight is underway across Pennsylvania orchards. This second generation together with an expected partial third generation represents a continuous challenge for all our fruit. Due to discrepancies observed between the predictive CM egg hatch model and the actual situation in the orchards, we strongly recommend using actual observations from an orchard as the main factor in deciding if and/or when the control measures are necessary. Applications of Altacor, Belt, Delegate, Tourismo or Voliam Flexi or Voliam Xpress should provide excellent control of CM.
  • By the end of the first week of August it will again be time to start controlling the second generations of tufted apple bud moth and obliquebanded leafroller. Some insecticides such as Altacor, Belt or Delegate used for the control of CM or OFM will also provide excellent control of larvae of both leafroller species. Intrepid or B. thuringhiensis based products should provide effective control of the leafroller larvae but will not control internal fruit feeders.
  • Although the numbers of Oriental fruit moth (OFM) observed in pheromone traps located at the Penn State Fruit Research and Extension Center continue to remain at a very low levels, from about this time of the season we should start to observe continuous flight of OFM. Similarly as with the CM, please use the actual local orchard observations (e.g., pheromone trap data and/or fruit injuries from earlier generation) as the main factor when deciding about the necessity for OFM control. Materials listed for the control of CM will also control OFM.
  • The pear psylla (PP) adults, eggs and nymphs are continuously present in many pear orchards, and growers should continue to apply appropriate control measures. Refer to the Tree Fruit Production Guide for a list of products and their efficacy. For better PP control removal of water sprouts on the inside of the tree will improve efficacy of applied treatments.

The 2011 season biofix for the Oriental fruit moth was established on April 19; codling moth on May 7; tufted apple bud moth on May 11; obliquebanded leafroller on May 29; spotted tentiform leafminer on April 06 and red banded leafroller on April 5.

Contact Information

Grzegorz (Greg) Krawczyk
  • Extension Tree Fruit Entomologist
Email:
Phone: 717-677-6116