Share

Technical References on Fruit Production

There are a number of sources of fruit production information available depending upon the level of knowledge desired.

This sheet was prepared to give a brief compilation of some textbooks and handbooks that pertain to fruit production. It is not meant to be all-inclusive but rather it will provide a beginning point to search for other references. The publications below may or may not be readily available in local libraries.

Encyclopedias

Encyclopedic data and articles typically provide world production figures and brief histories of fruit growing. Subjects are usually listed under specific crops. The technical "hands on" facets of growing the crop or the basic physiology of the crop are not commonly presented in these articles.

Technical References

The books listed in this category are technical in nature. They have two audiences. The first is for university teachers, researchers and extension personnel. The second is for commercial fruit growers that wish to have a greater understanding of fruit production.

University Research and Extension

  • Pennsylvania Tree Fruit Production Guide. R. M. Crassweller coordinator. Contact the Publications Distribution Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, 112 Agricultural Administration Building  University Park, PA 16802-2602. This is updated every 2 years and contains information on commercial fruit production. 
  • Concise Encyclopedia of Temperate Tree Fruit. T. Baugher and S. Singha, editors. 2003. Food Products Press. Binghamton, NY. Encyclopedic in nature with chapters written by numerous university research and extension personnel.
  • Apples - Botany, Production and Uses. D.C. Ferree and I.J. Warrington, editors. 2003. CABI Publishing. Cambridge, Mass. Comprehensive guide on apple tree physiology and fruit production.
  • The Peach - Botany, Production and Uses. Desmond R. Layne and Daniele Bassi, editors. 2008. CABI Publishing. Cambridge, Mass. Comprehensive guide on peach tree physiology and fruit production.
  • Modern Fruit Science. by Norman Childers, Justin R. Morris, and G. Steven Sibbett. Horticultural Publications. 3906 NW 31 Place., Gainesville, FL 32606. Phone: 904-372-5077. This classic textbook is on its tenth printing and was recently totally revised and updated. It is invaluable to those working in the field who wish to get a "hands-on" approach to fruit growing.
  • The Peach, World Cultivars to Marketing. N. F. Childers and W. B. Sherman (eds.) Horticultural Publications. 3906 NW 31 Place., Gainesville, FL 32606. This text is a compilation of articles by the foremost scientists in peach research and extension.
  • The Pear, Cultivars to Marketing. T. van der Zwet and N. F. Childers (eds.) Horticultural Publications. 3906 NW 31 Place., Gainesville, FL 32606. This text is a compilation of articles by the foremost scientists in pear research and extension.
  • Temperate Zone Pomology. by M. N. Westwood. Timber Press, 9999 S.W. Wilshire, Portland, Oregon 97225. This text is suitable as a second level textbook dealing in fruit production. The major emphasis being placed on tree physiology.
  • Physiology of Temperate Zone Fruit Trees. by Miklos Faust. John Wiley & Sons, Wiley-Interscience, 605 Third Ave., New York, NY, 10158-0012. The text provides basic plant physiology as related to fruit trees.
  • Rootstocks for Fruit Crops. Roy C. Rom and R. F. Carlson (eds.) John Wiley & Sons, Wiley-Interscience, 605 Third Ave., New York, NY, 10158-0012. A survey type text authored by several scientists devoted exclusively to the discussion of rootstocks for fruit crops.
  • Climate and the Orchard. H. C. Pereira (ed.) Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux, Central Sales, Farnham Royal, Slough SL2 3BN, ENGLAND. A basic textbook covering environmental affects on fruit tree physiology in the orchard. "The Biology of Apple and Pear Storage" by J. Fidler, B. Wilkinson, K. Edney and R. Sharples. Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux, Central Sales, Farnham Royal, Slough SL2 3BN, ENGLAND. A basic text covering fruit physiology as it relates to fruit storage.
  • Fruit Culture, Its Science and Art. by K. Ryugo. John Wiley & Sons, Wiley-Interscience, 605 Third Ave., New York, NY, 10158-0012. A textbook intended primarily for horticulture and plant science students who are interested in pursuing a career in some phase of pomology.
  • Post harvest. An Introduction to the Physiology and Handling of Fruit and Vegetables. R. Wills, W. Glasson, D. Graham, T. Lee and E. Hall. A British textbook on basic physiology of harvesting, handling and storing fruits and vegetables. To order contact Van Nostrand Reinhold, 115 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10003
  • Citrus Growing in Florida. by L. Jackson. The University of Florida Press, 15 NW 15th Street, Gainesville, FL 32611. College textbook on citrus production
  • The World Apple Market. 1994. A. D. O’Rourke. Food Products Press, 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, NY 13904-1580

Commercial Fruit Growers

  • "Peach Production Handbook" S. C. Myers (ed.) Management Operations Cooperative Extension Service The University of Georgia. Athens, Georgia. 30602. The handbook is geared towards commercial peach growers.
  • "Intensive Orcharding" c/o Good Fruit Grower, Dept. I-O, PO. Box 9219, Yakima, WA. 98909. Proceedings from a two day short course held in Washington State for commercial fruit growers.
  • "New Directions in Tree Fruit Pest Management" c/o Good Fruit Grower, PO Box 9219, Yakima, WA 98909-0219. Proceedings from a short course held in February 1991 and presents the latest information on integrated pest management as practiced in the United States. (Cost in 1992 was $10.00 plus $3.00 shipping and handling)
  • "Integrated Pest Management for Apples and Pears" This manual was prepared by IPM Eduction and Publications, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California, 6701 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, CA 94608-1239.
  • "Peaches, Plums and Nectarines" J. H. LaRue and R. S. Johnson (eds.). A high quality production manual presenting production practices for California stone fruits. It does have good sections on pest identification, irrigation and nutrition that are suitable to any region. To order write to: Publications, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California, 6701 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, CA 94608-1239.
  • "Compendium of Apple and Pear Diseases" A. Jones and H. Aldwinkle (eds.). Published by the American Phyotpathological Society. It is a compilation of all known disease and some physiological problems that occur in apples and pears. To order contact The American Phyotpathological Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121
  • “Compendium of Stone Fruit Diseases” J. M. Ogawa, E. I. Zehr, G. W. Bird, D. F. Ritchie, K. Uriu, and J. K. Uyemoto (eds.) 1995. Published by the American Phyotpathological Society. It is a compilation of all known disease and some physiological problems that occur in stone fruits. To order contact The American Phyotpathological Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121
  • “Compendium of Raspberry and Blackberry Diseases and Insects” M. A. Ellis, R. H. Converse, R. N. Williams, B. Williamson. (eds.) 1991. Published by the American Phyotpathological Society. It is a compilation of all known disease physiological and insect problems that occur in raspberries and black raspberries. To order contact The American Phyotpathological Society, 3340 Pilot Knob Rd., St. Paul, MN 55121
  • "Training and Pruning Apple and Pear Trees" C. Forshey, D. Elfving, and R. Stebbins. This book is a good primer on the fundamentals of pruning and includes chapters on light management, physioligical effects of pruning, and pruning practices. To order contact The American Society for Horticultural Science, 113 South West St., Suite 400, Alexandria, VA 22314-2824
  • "Intensive Orchard Management" Bruce Barritt. This text is a practical guideto planning, establishment and management of high density orchards that is well illustrated. To order contact: The Good Fruit Grower, PO Box 9219, Yakima, WA 98909-0219.
  • “Mid-Atlantic Orchard Monitoring Guide” H. W. Hogmire, Jr. This is a comprehensive text on all aspects of orchard monitoring for diseases, insects, mammals, and weeds.This 370 page guide includes 13 chapters, 18 apendixes, 322 full-color photos, 13 figures a glossary and reference section. To order contact: NRAES, Cooperative Extension, 152 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701. Phone: 607-255-7654. E-mail: nraes@cornell.edu.

Historical Information References

  • "North American Apples: Varieties, Rootstocks, Outlook" R. F. Carlson (ed.) Michigan State University Press, 25 Manly Miles Bldg., 1405 S. Harrison Rd., East Lansing, MI 48824. Published in 1970 this 197 page book looks at the major apple varieties in the United States as well as a brief chapter on old cultivars and the outlook for the future.
  • "History of Fruit Growing and Handling in the United States and Canada: 1860-1972" W. H. Upshaw (ed.). Order from: Pomona Book Exchange, Highway 52, Rocton P.O., Ontario, LOR IXO CANADA.
  • “Old Southern Apples” 1995. Creighton L. Calhoun, Jr. McDonald & Woodward Publishing Co., 6414 Riverland Drive, Fort Pierce, FL 34982. Phone: 407-468-6361. 326 pp, 48 color plates. This volume deals exclusively with apples grown in the southern United States. Information was obtained from the National Agricultural Library from old nursery catalogs and letters written to the Division of Pomology between 1885 and 1930
  • “Pomona’s Harvest: An Illustrated Chronicle of Antiquarian Fruit Literature.” 1996. H. F. Janson. Timber Press, Inc., 133 S. W. Second Ave. Suite 450, Portland OR. 97204-3527. Phone: 503-227-2878. 436 pp, 9 color photos, 139 line drawings.

Information for Homeowners

County Extension System

In each county of the United States there is a county extension office, whose purpose is to provide the citizens of the county information on a variety of topics relating to agriculture and home economics. In many cases they provide classes for homeowners in fruit production practices as well as written bulletins and pamphlets. The information that they provide is usually more tailored to your local growing conditions. You can find your local office by looking in the phone book in the county government section.

Local Book Stores

Many book stores have home gardening sections. In these you can find a vast array of pamphlets specifically written for homeowners. Two such series are the Ortho Home Garden and Sunset Books. Another booklet is: "Simon & Schuster's Step-by-Step Encyclopedia of Practical Gardening - Fruit". by H. Baker. Simon & Schuster Bldg., Rockefeller Center, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020.

  • "Uncommon Fruits Worthy of Attention: A Gardener's Guide" by Lee Reich. This text covers some of the more unusual native plants that are edible and includes chapters on pawpaw, gooseberry, persimmons, mulberry and more. To order write to Christopher Kaneb, Publicity, Addison-Wesley Publishing, 101 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10003.
  • "The Backyard Orchardist" by Stella Otto. The book was written by a fruit grower in Michigan in plain and easy to understand language. It has sections on all the major tree fruits and their care and culture. This book would make a perfect text for instructing Master Gardeners. To order contact Otto Graphics, 8082 Maple City Rd., Maple City, MI 49664.
  • "Growing Fruit in the Upper Midwest" by Don Gordon. This book would be ideal for those areas that have trouble growing fruit due to low winter temperatures. All tree and many small fruit are covered as well as some of the unusual native fruits. To order contact University of Minnesota Press, 2037 University Ave. Southeast, Minneapolis, MN 55414.
  • North American Fruit Explorers' is a volunteer organization of avid hobbyists and professional growers devoted to finding and preserving old and unusual fruit and nut types. They publish a quarterly journal, Pomona, that is composed of short articles submitted by the members detailing their experiences growing fruit. There are over 30 special interest groups within the society covering such topics as apples, acorns, jujube, kiwi, quince, pawpaw and many more less common fruits and nuts. To join, contact Tom Vorbeck, Treasurer NAFEX, RR1 Box 94, Chapin, IL 62628.

Download Publication

Article Details

Title

Technical References on Fruit Production

This publication is available in alternative media on request.

Contact Information

Robert Crassweller
  • Professor of Tree Fruit
Email:
Phone: 814-863-6163