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Soybean Sentinel Plot Report

Posted: June 28, 2017

With better growing conditions, most soybean fields seem to be growing well and have left slug damage behind (with few or no exceptions, I hope). From the reports we have this week pest populations remain low, bean leaf beetles, silver spotted skipper caterpillars, and leafhoppers are active, but we have not encountered meaningful populations. Remember that vegetative stages soybeans can tolerate up to 25% defoliation without dropping yield so do not overreact if you find some feeding damage in your fields. For diseases, one report of bacterial wilt and perhaps some anthracnose came in this week, so when scouting your fields, look out for these and others that might becoming active.

The Pennsylvania Soybean Promotion Board is funding a Soybean Sentinel Plot Program, which is being managed by Penn State Extension and The Department of Entomology at Penn State. In this effort, Penn State Extension Educators are regularly scouting 25 or so ‘typical’ soybean fields in nineteen counties across the state, reporting the populations of plant pathogens and insect pests that they find. Our goal is to keep folks aware of pests so that they will then scout their fields as part of an IPM program. It would be imprudent to use these reports as the basis or justification for an insecticide application or including insecticides in with a post emergence herbicide application.

In the reports below, pests that were found during scouting are listed with their severity, which is rated on a 1-10 scale with 10 being the highest. Growers should be sure to check their own fields to determine your local populations, but these reports will give you a sense of what pests are active in fields. Our reports are distributed via this weekly newsletter, Penn State’s Field Crop News, and will be available in the next day or two on Penn State’s Field Crop Entomology website.

Scouting Reports

26 June 2017 – Montgomery County – Andrew Frankenfield

Near Souderton, Planted 13 June

Due to wet soil conditions the majority of the soybeans in the area were planted in mid-June. Very warm soils and plenty of moisture allowed them to outgrow slug feeding, resulting in only minimal damage.

Growth stage: V1

  • No other diseases or insects to report.

26 June 2017 – Crawford County – Joel Hunter

Growth stage: V3

  • Slugs – Severity: 1
  • No diseases noted

24 June 2017 – Elk County – Nicole Carutis & Mellissa Rathbun

Near Kersey

Field was disked, then soybeans were drilled in 7.5” rows after last year’s corn

Growth stage: V2

  • Potato leafhopper – Severity: 1
  • Bacterial leaf wilt – Severity: 1

23 June 2017 – Blair County – Zach Larson

Near Martinsburg

Growth stage: V3-4

  • Slugs – Severity: 1
  • No diseases noted

23 June – Clinton County – Don Woodring

Near Eastville

Growth Stage: V1

  • Slugs – Severity: 1
  • Bean leaf beetle present, but minimal damage
  • No diseases noted

22 June – York County – John Rowehl/Tom Lockhart

Near Windsor

Growth stage: V3-4

  • Bean leaf beetle – Severity: 1
  • Mexican bean beetle – Severity: 1
  • Silver Spotted Skipper-1
  • No diseases noted
  • Diseases: Anthracnose (unconfirmed), in an isolated area

21 June – York County – John Rowehl/Tom Lockhart

Near Stewartstown

Growth stage: V3-4

  • Bean leaf beetle – Severity: 1
  • Mexican bean beetle – Severity: 1
  • Silver Spotted Skipper-1
  • No diseases noted

21 June – Clinton County – Don Woodring

Near Mill Hall

Growth stage: VC

  • Slugs – Severity: 1
  • No diseases noted

Contact Information

John Tooker
  • Extension Specialist
Phone: 814-865-7082