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Hay and Silage

Buying and Selling Hay

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) has developed this website for producers to list information concerning the need for hay or the availability of hay.

Buy and sell hay online. Listings by state and province.

Harvest Management

The goal of most forage programs is to maximize economic yield of nutrients while ensuring stand persistence. Frequent cutting produces high-quality forage while less frequent cutting generally results in increased stand longevity.

Alfalfa is the most important forage legume in Pennsylvania. It is a deep-rooted legume that grows best in moderate to well-drained soils.

When well managed and properly fertilized, newer varieties of red clover can potentially yield 4 to 5 tons of good quality forage. Red clover generally establishes quickly and can grow on soils too wet or too acid for alfalfa.

Birdsfoot trefoil (BFT) is a deep-rooted legume that grows well on poorly drained soils. When properly managed it can persist for many years.

The goal of most forage programs is to maximize economic yield of nutrients while ensuring stand persistence. Frequent cutting produces high-quality forage while less frequent cutting generally results in increased stand longevity.

In recent years, the adoption of incorporating a wide cutting swath in forage harvest to speed up the dry down process has been increasing on farms across the United States.

Every year the question arises regarding frost affects on third cuttings of Sorghum Sudangrass (SS) stands.

This fact sheet explains the use of chemicals in hay technology that are capable of decreasing the drying time of cut forage, thereby increasing the chances of getting the hay baled before inclement weather arrives.

Preservation

Background information regarding silage preservation.

Making round bale silage consists of wilting a forage to 50 to 60 percent moisture content, baling it in a round baler, and ensiling it within a plastic cover.

Making round bale silage consists of wilting a forage to 50 to 60 percent moisture content, baling it in a round baler, and ensiling it within a plastic cover.

Shrink is referred to as the loss of the commodity from harvest until sale. Shrink affects forages and can range from 5% to more than 40% and some instances losses can be higher.

Shrink also affects forages and can range from 5% to more than 40% and some instances losses can be higher.