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Fact Sheets

Fact sheets on various pesticide-related topics.

Pesticide Safety

Hard copies of these fact sheets can be ordered, unless otherwise indicated, by calling the Publications Distribution Center at 814-865-6713.

An adjuvant is added to a pesticide product or pesticide spray mixture to enhance the pesticide’s performance and/or the physical properties of the spray mixture.

This fact sheet describes the proper procedures for storing pesticides and application equipment. Correct storage is important in preventing vandalism, theft, or the possible misuse of products. Details on storage space, location, construction, environment, security, and safe practices are provided.

This fact sheet provides valuable information for pesticide applicators in the event of a chemical spill. Topics include how to control, contain and clean up spills or leaks, tips to prevent spills, and the contents of a spill kit. Also included is a list of emergency numbers to fill in that applicators should have in case of a pesticide spill.

Taken from the How to Handle Chemical Spills fact sheet.

For many toxic chemicals, the respiratory (breathing) system is the quickest and most direct route of entry into the circulatory system.

Pesticides are transported from manufacturers to distributors and dealers, from retailers to end users, and from storage and mixing locations to application sites. Accidents can happen at any point in the chain, even when transport distances are short.

Safety Recommendations and Legal Requirements

For all pesticides to be effective against the pests they are intended to control, they must be biologically active, or toxic.

Controlling pests in and around the home and garden is seemingly a never-ending problem. Insects invade homes, contaminate stored food products, carry certain organisms that cause serious human and animal diseases, infest pets, and threaten fruit trees, ornamental plants, and vegetables.

Transferring even a small amount of pesticide into any size/type of container is illegal with the exception of approved bulk repackaging into containers designed and constructed to hold more than 55 gallons of liquid or 100 pounds of dry product. (only available electronically.)

This regulation covers pesticides that are used in the production of agricultural plants on farms, forests, nurseries, and enclosed-space productions.

All pesticides must be toxic, or poisonous, to be effective against the pests they are intended to control. Because pesticides are toxic, they are potentially hazardous to humans, animals, other organisms, and the environment. Therefore, people who use pesticides or regularly come in contact with them must understand the relative toxicity and potential health effects of the products they use.

PDF, 69.8 kB

Use this list to keep important phone numbers for pesticide spills.

Applicator Information and Forms

List below are some fact sheets, applications, and forms geared specifically to pesticide application businesses and applicators.

Information about the Pennsylvania Pesticide Hypersensitivity Registry and the application to complete for placement on the registry.

PDF, 184.4 kB

Recordkeeping forms that private applicators can use to keep records when restricted use pesticides are used. Operations that employ agricultural workers or handlers covered by the Worker Protection Standard must keep records for all pesticide applications.

PDF, 34.4 kB

Recordkeeping forms that commercial and public applicators can use to keep records of all their pesticide applications.

PDF, 125.6 kB

This checklist serves as a brief overview of the basic Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) WPS pesticide requirements for compliance.

PDF, 19.2 kB

This checklist and signature form provides acknowledgement of having received instruction on the safety precautions to be used when working with pesticides and treated areas based on Worker Protection Standards (WPS).

PDF, 19.2 kB

Reconocimiento haber recibido instrucción sobre las precauciones de seguridad que deberán de ser usadas con pesticidas y áreas tratadas.

Click on the application in the FORMS section (on the right hand side) to download.

Other Fact Sheets

Links to other fact sheets and reports referenced throughout the website.

This website provides links to fact sheets, labels, and Fumigant Management Plans.

The page on our website contains a list of fact sheets and several calculation worksheets to help you comply with the Container/Containment regulation.

Most of these fact sheets were originally developed by the Penn State West Nile Virus Coordinating Committee.

These web pages from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provide information about mosquito control including specific pesticides.

Consumer Fact Sheets

The following fact sheets were written for consumers. Each fact sheet is also available in Spanish.

Labels are legal documents providing directions on how to mix, apply, store, and dispose of a pesticide product. This means using a pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling is a violation of federal law.

Where do you store your pesticides? A nationwide study by the Environmental Protection Agency revealed that almost one-half of surveyed households with children under the age of 5 had at least one pesticide stored within their reach.

All pesticide users have the responsibility to properly dispose of pesticide wastes, such as unused chemicals and pesticide containers. Improperly disposed pesticide wastes can create serious hazards for humans, animals, and the environment. Reducing pesticide waste requires careful selection of the correct pesticide and correct quantity, and careful calculation of the amount of pesticide needed for each application.

Protective clothing used when mixing, loading, or applying pesticides provides a barrier between the pesticide and the human body. Even though it can be uncomfortable to wear, appropriate protective clothing and/or equipment should always be worn by anyone working with pesticides.

When you discover a pest problem in or around your home, the first step is to identify the pest. The pest may be a weed, plant disease, insect, rodent, mold, mildew, bird, or other nuisance.

PDF, 379.4 kB

Understanding what you read on a pesticide label is important in preventing contamination or poisoning while applying, mixing, selecting, storing, and disposing pesticides. This fact sheet explains the information on the front of a pesticide label and other important information found elsewhere on the label. (Spanish translation of UO215)

PDF, 372.8 kB

A 1992 nationwide study by the Environmental Protection Agency revealed that almost one-half of surveyed households with children under the age of 5 had at least one pesticide stored within their reach. Proper pesticide storage helps prolong chemical shelf life while protecting the health of people, animals, and the environment. This full-color publication explains how to store pesticides safely. (Spanish translation of UO216)

PDF, 150.7 kB

When improperly disposed of, pesticide wastes can create serious hazards for humans, animals, and the environment. This fact sheet provides important tips on how to properly dispose of pesticides. (Spanish translation of UO214)

PDF, 304.8 kB

Protective clothing used when mixing, loading, or applying pesticides provides a barrier between the pesticide and the human body. Even though it can be uncomfortable to wear, appropriate protective clothing and/or equipment should always be worn by anyone working with pesticides. This full-color publication details why protective equipment is important, as well as the various types of equipment available and when they should be used. (Spanish translation of UO218)

PDF, 500.9 kB

Many pest problems may require professional assistance. If you determine that professional help is needed, this publication can help you make sure the company you hire meets all the legal and educational requirements that give them the privilege to service your home. (Spanish translation of UO219)