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November 18, 2013

Penn State Extension has planned nine educational meetings for tree fruit growers throughout Pennsylvania. The meetings are designed to address current challenges with the latest research based information.

November 18, 2013

Did you ever wonder what happens to the "flushable" products on the market? How flushable are they?

November 18, 2013

The two-year project is supported by a $600,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

November 18, 2013

Is there a gardener on your holiday gift list that you need to buy for? Gardeners love to receive gifts that fuel their passion for gardening.

November 17, 2013

Penn State Extension's traditional expertise extends into unique national and international shale energy arenas that benefit all.

November 15, 2013

Pineapple sage as an excellent Fall accent

The White Garden at Sissinghurst Castle, Kent, England.  Photo: ALAMY
November 15, 2013

Vita Sackville-West was an aristocratic writer and English gardener with lots of panache and a complicated life-style. It also didn’t hurt to have plenty of funds available…

November 14, 2013

Vole populations exhibit distinctive population fluctuations of approximately 4 year cycles. One of the last tasks in getting the orchards ready for winter is planning your strategy to control voles and prevent their damage.

Sweet potato chilling injury.
November 14, 2013

Harvested vegetables are living systems that age with time. As a grower, your goal is to slow down the aging process. To do that, you need to understand, and manage, four natural processes: respiration, transpiration, ethylene production, and chilling injury. Proper cooling is the first step, followed by maintaining the optimum temperature and relative humidity (RH) for each vegetable.

Do you know how to cook each of these vegetables?
November 14, 2013

Local food production and use is a many-faceted topic. One issue that is addressed less often is the fact that a growing number of people do not cook. Is it lack of time or lack of confidence or other factors that hinder use of local food in home kitchens?

Along with deer damage, climate change, and deforestation, earthworms are another stressor for our trees.
November 13, 2013

Natural Resources scientists at Cornell University are expressing concern about the effects of the common earthworm on the health of forests in the Northeast. The question they are asking is "What are the effects of the invasive worms on local forest ecosystems and native plants?"

During the Civil War era, residents of Adams County would harvest wild and cultivated plants for their medicinal, culinary and other properties.  Bloodroot, was used as a heart stimulant.
November 13, 2013

With all the excitement, celebration, passion, and enthusiasm of the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War and Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, I thought that it would be fun to learn about gardening during the Civil War. Gardening was a means of sustenance and survival during that era.

Photo: Thomas G. Barnes, University of Kentucky
November 13, 2013

Tiarella cordifolia has routinely appeared at the Philadelphia Flower Show exhibits, in both commercial and educational displays.

November 12, 2013

This website serves the purpose of helping homeowners find ways to reduce stormwater either by management installations or by adopting habits that reduce stormwater runoff and/or improve stormwater quality. Information on this site is offered as homeowner advice only.

Jim Clark, a water resources educator with Penn State Extension in McKean County, collected water from a popular roadside spring in north-central Pennsylvania.
November 12, 2013

Roadside springs are a common source of drinking water in Pennsylvania but little is known about the quality of these water supplies. Penn State Water Resources Extension Educators Jim Clark and Diane Oleson presented a webinar on October 30, 2013, which included water quality results from a recent survey of 35 heavily used roadside springs across the state. The objective of the survey was to determine the drinking water safety of these springs and to increase awareness about the use of roadside springs for drinking water supplies.

November 12, 2013

Based on vole monitoring reports from the Penn State Fruit Research and Extension Center in Biglerville, 2013 may have been an ideal year for vole reproduction in orchards. Late fall is an important time to place bait for voles because this practice helps reduce populations before the onset of winter, when vole damage is most severe and snow cover precludes the use of toxicants. Timing influences the success of control programs. Wet weather reduces the effectiveness of toxicants. Therefore, try to place the bait when the weather is likely to be fair and dry for at least three days. Baits are most effective when naturally occurring foods are limited.

November 11, 2013

For the past three years, the Penn State Pesticide Education Program and county Master Gardener Program have partnered to share a valuable lesson of poison prevention with 1st grade students across the state. The outreach program—with a lesson designed to meet elementary 1st grade curriculum standards in Health, Safety, and Physical Education, and Environmental and Ecology Education—has grown tremendously with the help of enthusiastic Master Gardeners.

Community leaders and citizens in New Kensington take inventory of community assets during a recent community visioning workshop
November 9, 2013

Last month in this space my colleague Bill Shuffstall outlined some factors leading to successful local economies and communities. Let's explore these a little further.

This massive old swamp white oak at Jennings Prairie is easily 80-100 feet tall. It is very old and has taken some hits over the years, but it remains a majestic presence, scars and all.
November 8, 2013

Swamp white oak is native to the eastern United States and Canada, typically found on soils that do not drain well. It tolerates periodic flooding, but not constantly inundated soils.

November 8, 2013

When talking about fall color, the conversation usually is about Pennsylvania’s hillsides and mountains covered with colored foliage of trees such as red maples and hickories. While those trees and others can be brought into the landscape to provide late season interest, there are shrubs that can be utilized to bring colors to the eye level.