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June 14, 2017

The annual Penn State Extension Agronomic Field Diagnostic Clinic will be held on July 19 and 20, 2017, 9am – 4:30pm at the Penn State Agronomy Research Farm near Rock Springs, PA.

June 14, 2017

Tooth decay is the number one chronic disease that affects young children and is five times more common than asthma. Untreated, tooth decay can cause pain and infection, resulting in children who stay out of care and experience problems with eating and speaking. Dental decay (also known as dental caries) can affect children’s concentration and learning. Twenty percent of children between five and eleven years of age have at least one untreated, decayed tooth. Children from low-income families suffer from twice as much untreated tooth decay (25%) as children from higher income families (11%). (CDC 2014) Yet tooth decay is easily preventable. Regular dental habits such as toothbrushing and a healthy diet can reduce the occurrence of cavities greatly. To be most effective, both should be part of a child’s routine at home and at his early care and education program. Additionally, adults in the child’s life should model good oral health practices and participate in routines with the child.

Penn State Extension educators have developed food-safety training programs to accommodate the cultural norms of plain sect farmers.
June 13, 2017

Penn State Extension educators have developed food-safety training programs to accommodate the cultural norms of plain sect — Amish and Mennonite — farmers.

"Ice Cream @ Lowestoft, Suffolk" By Tim Parkinson/Flickr.com CC By 2.0
June 13, 2017

Vacations often mean eating out and enjoying local food favorites which can lead to weight gain. Follow some simple strategies to maintain a healthy lifestyle and avoid gaining extra pounds while away.

Photo by Pamela T.  Hubbard
June 13, 2017

Fresh flowers on my dining table, kitchen counter, and desk brighten my home and make me smile. Bringing profuse bouquets into the house, however, means a limited show in the garden. You can solve this problem by creating a flower garden specifically for cutting. I will explain how to construct and care for a cutting garden using flowers most suitable for the Pennsylvania.

June 12, 2017

The dog days of summer can be tough on your vegetables. Even heat-loving plants like tomatoes and peppers might need a little extra care during a heat wave. Here is how you can to protect your garden – and harvest during a heat wave.

Photo: Tara Baugher
June 12, 2017

Fruit surface color is complex because it can be influenced by genetics and mutations, environmental factors, crop load, plant nutrition, plant stresses, and plant growth regulators.

With funding from USDA, researchers aim to develop a model for engaging stakeholders and communities to ensure adequate water quality and quantity. Image: USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
June 12, 2017

A group of institutions led by Penn State has received nearly $2.2 million for the first year of a planned four-year, $5 million project aimed at developing a model for engaging communities and stakeholders to ensure adequate supplies of good-quality water both for and from agriculture. Partners include the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service, Arizona State University and the University of Nebraska Lincoln.

June 12, 2017

A nationwide analysis of water use over the past 30 years finds that there is a disconnect between rural and urban areas, with most urban areas becoming more water efficient and most rural areas becoming less and less efficient over time.

Well in Central Pennsylvania. Photo: Bryan Swistock, Penn State University
June 12, 2017

On May 31, 2017, the Penn State Water Resources Extension team hosted a webinar on Lessons from Over 30 Years of Water Well Research and Outreach in Pennsylvania. The presenter was Bryan Swistock, a Water Resources Extension Associate with Penn State Extension in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management.

Photo: P. Landschoot, Penn State
June 12, 2017

As summer approaches, plans are being finalized for disease prevention and control programs. One group of fungicides, the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDHI), has taken a more prominent role in controlling turfgrass diseases and provides an alternative to fungicides in other mode-of-action groups for resistance management.

People often have the mistaken idea that backyard birds and their eggs are free from Salmonella, but a recent study at Penn State showed a small percentage of positive eggs exist even in this sector. In fact, any poultry can be carriers of Salmonella, and they usually have no outward symptoms of disease.”
June 9, 2017

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this spring reports that there are eight ongoing outbreaks of Salmonella in 47 states linked to backyard poultry in the United States. As of May 13, 71 people had been hospitalized — 36 percent of those infected are children under the age of 5. Fortunately, no deaths have been reported.

White grub damage in a residential lawn. Photo: N. Bosold, Penn State (retired)
June 9, 2017

White grubs are probably one of the most common turfgrass insect pests encountered in Pennsylvania lawns.

June 8, 2017

Learn about barn door automation, accessible trails and beaches and our work with dairy farmers in Pennsylvania.

June 7, 2017

Widespread, organized rainfall appears unlikely over the next week, and some sunshine may return to the state, at times, through the weekend.

June 7, 2017

With all of the rainfall that we have been seeing this spring, some of the nitrogen could have been lost to leaching or nitrification. Here’s how you can ensure that your corn crop has enough nitrogen for the season.

June 7, 2017

As for the past five growing seasons, again this year The Pennsylvania Soybean Promotion Board is funding a Soybean Sentinel Plot Program, which is being managed by Penn State Extension and The Department of Entomology at Penn State.

Figure 1. Slug-damaged corn plants (Photo by Andrew Frankenfield, Penn State Extension).
June 7, 2017

This spring has been different and odd enough in many parts of Pennsylvania that folks are looking for a return to normal, whatever that means. Most calls and other communications that I have received from farmers have had to do with slugs, but other invertebrate pests are also active and I will mention them briefly today.