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September 26, 2016

Warming climate triggers changes in forests' impact on cleaner water. A warming climate is causing earlier springs and later autumns in eastern forests of the United States, lengthening the growing season for trees and potentially changing how forests function. Scientists have found that in years with early springs, trees use more nitrogen to grow than is naturally provided in soil, which could impact tree growth rates and the amount of carbon dioxide forests take out of the atmosphere.

September 26, 2016

All over the world, lakes, rivers, and coastal waters are threatened by high nutrient inputs. Nitrate or phosphates from waste-waters or fertilizers causes eutrophication. The consequence: Algae, in particular cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), grow uncontrollably and may release toxic substances. Hence, extensive water monitoring is indispensable for drinking water supply and water protection. Researchers have now develop a smart monitoring system, combining various technologies in a depth profile-measuring multi-sensor buoy for monitoring water bodies and in particular algae growth.

September 26, 2016

Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn Thursday announced the 2016 State Forest Resource Management Plan that will chart the course of Pennsylvania’s future state forests has been finalized and is now available.

September 19, 2016

While current efforts to curtail agricultural runoff will improve the health of Lake Erie, much more work will be needed to protect the streams that feed the lake, new research shows.

September 19, 2016

PPCPs are widely released into the world’s freshwaters and oceans, where they mix at low concentrations over long time periods and seep into diverse environmental pathways such as surface water, groundwater, drinking water or soil.

September 13, 2016

A new study contradicts the common assumption that down-the-drain disposal is an important source of pharmaceutical pollution in wastewater.

September 13, 2016

The decrease in fishery productivity in Lake Tanganyika since the 1950s is a consequence of global warming rather than just overfishing, according to a new report. The lake was becoming warmer at the same time in the 1800s that the abundance of fish began declining and the lake's algae started decreasing. Large-scale commercial fishing did not begin on Lake Tanganyika until the 1950s.

September 13, 2016

Kansans who own water wells show more awareness of state water policy issues than those who rely on municipal water supplies, according to a study that could have implications for groundwater management and environmental policies.

September 6, 2016

Norristown, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has released results of surveillance for Aedes mosquitoes, which have been found to be vectors of the Zika virus. At this time, there have not been any cases of Zika transmitted locally in Pennsylvania, nor have mosquitoes tested positive for the virus.

September 6, 2016

Hundreds of homeowners with private water wells, springs, cisterns, ponds or lakes received educational assistance at two exhibits during Ag Progress Days on August 16-18, 2016.

September 6, 2016

A recent study out of the University of Colorado indicates since introduction of horizontal drilling combined with high-volume hydraulic fracturing, the rate of groundwater contamination remained the same as in the previous years.

September 6, 2016

Researchers studied drilling wastes produced at two research wells near Morgantown and found they are well below federal guidelines for radioactive or hazardous waste.

August 29, 2016

A study shows that weather patterns tied to climate change may increase the severity of algal blooms in Chesapeake Bay as extreme rainfall cycles flush larger amounts of nitrogen from fertilizer and other sources into the Susquehanna River. The researchers found that a spike in rainfall can increase nitrogen levels in the bay even if the amount of fertilizer used on land remains the same, leading to explosive algae growth that poisons humans and wildlife, and devastates fisheries.

August 29, 2016

Penn State Extension Educator, Jim Clark, presented information on basic hydrology and where to go for drought monitoring information at a Drought Seminar for Potter County Farmers on Thursday, August 11, 2016.

August 29, 2016

Researchers developed an affordable way to monitor rivers and stream flow, 24/7, using open source products.

August 29, 2016

A new virus has been identified in association with a die-off of largemouth bass in Pine Lake in Wisconsin's Forest County. The previously unknown virus was isolated at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's La Crosse Fish Health Center from dead fish collected by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) during an investigation into a May 2015 fish kill in the northeastern Wisconsin lake.

Jim Clark and Bryan Swistock, Penn State Extension Water Personnel, explain water test results to Elk County Residents
August 29, 2016

Penn State Extension Water Educator, Jim Clark, and Extension Water Specialist, Bryan Swistock, presented a workshop for 61 Venango County Residents on Tuesday, August 2, 2016.

L to R: Jeff Tanner, PA CleanWays President, Bob Strait, PA CleanWays Volunteer, Justin Lund, McKean County Recycling Coordinator, and Charlie Jones, Smethport Borough Employee help with PA CleanWays Tire Recycling Event
August 22, 2016

Penn State Extension Water Resources Educator, Jim Clark, assisted PA CleanWays of McKean County remove another two thousand tires from McKean County, filling two tractor-trailers on Saturday, July 23, 2016.

August 22, 2016

Project Learning Tree offers grants up to $1,000 to schools and youth organizations for environmental service-learning projects that link classroom learning to the real world. Students implement an action project they help design to green their school or to improve an aspect of their neighborhood’s environment. The deadline to apply is September 30, 2016 -- Funding will be distributed in December 2016.

August 22, 2016

A new draft report released Monday from the Department of Environmental Protection lists four miles of the Lower Susquehanna River as impaired for recreation, but not for protecting aquatic life as requested by the Fish and Boat Commission, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation-PA and other groups.