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Early winter is the time to develop your crop plan for next year because it will soon be time to start seedlings and the whirlwind will begin.

Early winter is the time to develop your crop plan for next year because it will soon be time to start seedlings and the whirlwind will begin. At a recent CSA day organized by Lehigh County Extension’s Brian Moyer, I shared some tips for crop planning. What follows is a teaser, just the first few steps of the crop planning procedure I put together based on the great crop planning information Josh Volk from Slow Hand Farm recently shared with us.

Plant, weed, hoe, cultivate, water, plant, fertilize, water... No time to stop and take a close look for pests and diseases? Take a few minutes. It could save your crop.

As you plan for successful organic transplant production here are a few things to consider for healthy transplants.

If you are going to spray it is important to use products with good efficacy in a way that makes them most likely to impact the pest of concern. Here are some suggestions from researcher Galen Dively, University of Massachusetts.

For small scale vegetable growers just getting started, these two hot bed systems are a step up from growing under lights or in your kitchen window without all the costs of heating an entire greenhouse.

If you rely on a backpack sprayer, it is important to choose the right sprayer, calibrate correctly, measure correctly and use the right nozzles. Rutgers has a new set of online videos to help you with this process.

Do you know what pests and diseases are a problem in your area? There are several online tools to help you monitor and keep up to date on the proximity and likelihood for pests and plant diseases. If you grow vegetables take a look to make sure you are receiving current information.