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2014 4-H Military Partnership Annual Report

Need

87% of Pennsylvania’s Military Child & Youth population resides in counties that do not contain active duty military installations resulting in them not being near traditional military support systems. Although military installations and armories are not in each of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties, 4-H is available and provides consistent programming in a supportive and safe environment for military kids.

Response

  • 27% increase in military youth enrolled in 4-H for FY14 following a marketing campaign, including a press release on the 4-H Military Partnership, targeting military families. Campaign was conducted statewide via military partners, 4-H educators, website postings and statewide distribution lists.
  • Over 600 4-H youth were exposed to military awareness during service project in support of military youth conducted during the 2014 State Achievement Days. This gave them a higher understanding of importance of sup-porting military youth in their community.
  • Military family members gained a insight into 4-H through Discover 4-H workshops conducted by 4-H educators at fourteen military focused events during FY14. These events included Strong Bonds, family days, Army Re-serve YLEAD, residential and day camps, and Month of the Military Child celebrations.
  • Cumberland County 4-H staff conducted 4-H 101 training for six Child & Youth Services staff at Susquehanna Defense Logistics Agency resulting in implementation of two on-installation 4-H Military Clubs.
  • Carlisle Barracks 4-H Club continues to find innovative ways to increase club awareness and membership. A 4-H open house was held for the Car-lisle Barracks Community at the start of their program year allowing them to introduce what they had to offer. This resulted in an increase in membership and promoted awareness of 4-H among the Army Community.
  • A combined total of 213 community service hours were contributed by Tobyhanna Army Depot and Carlisle Barracks 4-H Clubs. This volunteer service has a value of $4673 based on numbers garnered from Independent Sector. The youth gained insight into the value of helping others while representing military youth, the Army and 4-H in a positive light. Clubs engaged in off-post community service projects. Local food banks, Ronald McDonald House and various community based events benefited from these hours.

Impact

  • 25 military teens representing Army National Guard, Army Reserve, Active Duty Army, Navy Reserve and Air National Guard engaged in a Teen Tech Day Camp instructed by Dauphin County 4-H Educator. Teens worked in teams to produce eight storied movies using stop motion techniques. 96% of teens in attendance left with a greater understanding of how to develop stop motion movies and 92% departed with greater confidence in using production equipment.
  • 85% of the youth enrolled in School Age Services at Susquehanna Defense Logistics Agency joined the on-site 4 H club following a Healthy Living Day Camp conducted by Cumberland County 4-H staff. 100% of the teen members indicate they are making healthier snack choices.
  • 77 military family members engaged in the Rockets to the Rescue 4-H Science Day Kits during Operation Uplifting and Strengthening Air Families Family Camp. 74% of families in attendance had limited knowledge of 4-H prior to Rockets to the Rescue with 100% indicating they had a better under-standing of 4-H following program. 33% of the non-4-H families indicated plans to follow up with 4-H in their local communities.
  • Carlisle Barracks 4-H Drama Club used the skills they gained to create a video of the SAC program year that went out to all the members in the Carlisle Barracks school age program. Members studied various parts of drama and learned how to make movies/PowerPoints. The video included animation, sounds, music, photos and clip art.
  • Tobyhanna Army Depot enhanced their 4-H program by collaborating with 3 new community partners. These new partnerships lead to increased club participation in Kick Butts Day and programs relating to healthy living and environmental educational.

Quotes:

"I liked learning about how to be a good leader and all the support I received from the counselors. I want to go back and be a counselor some day and encourage young kids, like they encouraged me."- Garrett, Army Youth

"I loved learning about all the different types of fish in Pennsylvania and getting to go fishing was the best. I met lots of new friends that are in different 4-H clubs, but live right near me! I can't wait to see them soon at Grange.”, Grace, Army Youth

“Designing and building the launcher and rocket with my kids was fun. We will take ours home and continue to improve upon our design. My kids will spend hours launching it in the backyard. We are definitely going to check out our local 4-H when we get home!”, James, Airman

4-H Military Partnership In Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania State University,
Penn State Extension/State 4-H Office
115 Agricultural Sciences and Industries Building,
University Park, PA 16802-2601
Phone: 814-865-2264
E-Mail: paomk@agsci.psu.edu
Website: www.extension.psu.edu/4-h

Carlisle Barracks CYSS
7459 Bouquet Road
Carlisle, PA 17013
717 245-3801/4555

Tobyhanna Army Depot CYSS
11 Hap Arnold Blvd.,
Bldg 335 Box 5044
Tobyhanna, PA 18466
570-615-9013

Susquehanna DLA CYSS
Building 255, G Ave.
New Cumberland, PA 17070
717-770-6768

4-H Military Partnerships are supported by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, 4-H National Headquarters; U.S. Army Child, Youth and School Services; U. S. Air Force Child and Youth Programs; U.S. Navy Child and Youth Programs; and Penn State Extension 4-H Program though grant funding at Kansas State University.

Additional funding to support Pennsylvania 4-H’s work with military youth include Penn State Extension, Operation: Military Kids, the 2014 Department of Defense Deployment Support Camp and the 2014 Air National Guard/Air Force Reserve Camps Grant.

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2014 4-H Military Partnership Annual Report

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